Lithic Technology

The study of lithic technology is useful in several ways. First and foremost it provides information as to how human society and technology developed in general, and how prehistoric Man adapted to different circumstances, such as the presence or absence of suitable lithic raw materials. Secondarily, the study of lithic technology – not least through the construction of operational schemas (technological profiles) – is a valuable tool in the dating of assemblages, as many operational schemas are quite diagnostic.

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Technological 'master-schema': the modules and sequences of most operational schemas (Ballin 2009)

Technological 'master-schema': the modules
and sequences of most operational schemas (Ballin 2009).

Through my carrier, I have produced numerous papers focusing on lithic technology, some of which discuss methodological aspects, whereas others deal with specific technological approaches, such as the bipolar technique, the Levallois-like technique, and the reduction techniques of the later Bronze Age, or techniques adapted to the reduction of specific raw materials.

The use of technological attributes (flaking angle) as diagnostic elements. The present illustration shows how most southern Norwegian blade assemblages are defined by a c. 80-83° flaking angle and Neolithic assemblages by a c. 75-77° flaking angle.

The use of technological attributes (flaking angle) as diagnostic elements.
The present illustration shows how most southern Norwegian blade assemblages are
defined by a c. 80-83° flaking angle and Neolithic assemblages by a c. 75-77° flaking angle.